Kernel and glibc Compatibility

Stuck with a problem in your code? Seek help here.

Kernel and glibc Compatibility

Postby evansste » November 27th, 2015, 12:56 pm

I'm trying to install MATLAB on a 64-bit machine that is currently running Lubuntu. I've gotten the software to install, but the license manager program isn't starting correctly. It fails with errors -- one of them being that it is unable to create a file.

After re-examining the system requirements, I have noticed that the Mathworks requires a version of Linux that is built using Kernel 2.4.x and glibc (glibc6) 2.3.2. I'm using Lubuntu, and the Kernel is a version that is higher than that. Could this be the reason as to why I'm running into issues, or are later Kernel versions able to perform the tasks of earlier Kernel versions?

If I need to use the specified Kernel and glibc, is there some way to change that in Lubuntu, or do I have to find a different distribution that uses that Kernel and glibc? If I have to use a different distribution of Linux that uses Kernel 2.4.x and glibc (glibc6) 2.3.2, is there any way to find that distribution based on these Kernel/glibc versions?

I'm fairly new to Linux, so please forgive me if these questions seem silly. As always, I greatly appreciate any input that anyone is able/willing to provide.
evansste
 
Posts: 85
Joined: October 8th, 2014, 8:19 am

Re: Kernel and glibc Compatibility

Postby st2000 » November 27th, 2015, 4:25 pm

Easy way out: Have you tried Octave?

Hard way out: Build a system that has exactly what you want w.r.t. kernel and libraries.

Some might say Linux is a moving target. And that's sometimes good and other times not so good. Open source packages like Octave get rebuilt often because, well, because anyone can rebuild them. Every time something changes in the kernel or libraries someone (usually called a "packager") rebuilds the distribution they maintain. And that can literally be 10's of 1000's of applications!

Commercial software is usually not given out. There are rare cases where some gets given out (like Nvidia drivers) but usually it is up to the company to maintain a compatible version.

Middle of the road ways out:
1. You bought it, right? So contact Matlab and demand an up to date version of the package you already own.
2. Get into Matlab forums and find out just what is incompatible. You might be ok w/the kernel you have. So it may just be the libraries.

Wow, from the looks of it, kernel 2.4.x is circa 2001 to 2003. That's a lot of time rewinding (how old is this copy of Matlab??). You might try web pages like this one: https://old-linux.com/. I don't think lubuntu existed back then (2001 - 2003). But other distributions did. I think these are ISO images for the most part. So download and burn a disc (probably CD back then) and start installing. Be aware that some distributions (well, maybe not this far back) try and bring in updated versions of code during the installation process. So you might want to keep the computer isolated.

Geez, I just remembered you asked in your original thread about 64 bit systems. Moving the clock back this far may make it hard to find a 64 bit distribution.

Maybe others have better ideas of a good way to go here...
st2000
 
Posts: 1453
Joined: February 3rd, 2011, 6:10 pm

Re: Kernel and glibc Compatibility

Postby evansste » November 27th, 2015, 5:32 pm

Thanks so much, st2000. I can't thank you enough for the link that you provided. I'll also look into Octave

You're right, the version of MATLAB that I'm using, is extremely old. It's at least ten years old. I've been using it for years, and it has served me well. However, my new motherboard won't run Windows XP. Just one more confirmation that I made a good choice by moving to Linux.

I received Linux downloads, from the Mathworks, just moments before everything closed on the eve of Thanksgiving. The support representative was great, but it was time to close shop. I skimmed through the installation instructions, and everything seemed pretty straight-forward. But, I ran into issues after they had closed. If all else fails, I'll call them back on Monday. However, I'm so eager to get up and running that I had to keep searching for answers until then.

I've gotten things to work, through Wine, with a 32-bit installation CD (I mentioned this in another post). I'm amazed at how fast everything is even with a 32-bit system that has newer technology. My old system took a little over three days to run one of my programs. This new system (still 32-bit) completes in about six hours. I can't wait to see what a 64-bit system will do.
evansste
 
Posts: 85
Joined: October 8th, 2014, 8:19 am

Re: Kernel and glibc Compatibility

Postby asheets » November 28th, 2015, 2:15 pm

If your version of MATLAB is glibc-version dependent, then you have a problem. You'll have to find the exact OS/kernel that MATLAB was written for. Shouldn't be that hard a problem, however. I'll look into it and try to come up with an iso for a version that should work for you.

Minor problem though -- a 2.4 kernel might not be able to handle some parts of your motherboard without some custom kernel compiling.

EDIT: Woof -- this goes WAY back... it almost predates my own Linux experience. Wikipedia says that this ties in with Debian 3.1, and Stackflow says RedHat (NOT RHEL) 7.x. Here's a download link for old Debian versions -- http://cdimage.debian.org/mirror/cdimage/archive/ -- but no dice on RH7 (not that you'd want that in any case, because it had several pretty severe vulnerabilities on the open Internet).

My suggestion would be to try a different flavor of a current 32-bit Linux -- CentOS or Debian would be my choices for MATLAB. Don't try a 64-bit OS right off, as you'll just have to load up 32-bit libraries anyway.

EDIT 2: Just got off a chat with my employer's MATLAB Linux SME -- he reminded me that we have to be very careful with MATLAB versioning, as MathWorks has always written things such that they are very exacting in kernel, glibc, and java versioning. They go out of their way to fine tune. Our MATLAB boxes, as a result, don't fall into the company's upgrade cadence for this very reason -- we are "hands off" unless we get a go ahead from MathWorks to upgrade.
asheets
 
Posts: 298
Joined: February 17th, 2011, 4:30 pm

Re: Kernel and glibc Compatibility

Postby evansste » November 28th, 2015, 4:03 pm

Thanks, asheets. The information you provided is extremely helpful.

After st2000's post, I headed over to the link, that he provided, and downloaded the ISO file for a 64-bit version of Mandrake (called Mandriva on the download page). It was the oldest ISO on that page that is 64-bit. I haven't been able to try it yet since I've been trying to burn it for quite some time now (I'm on my second attempt now and Brasero is either hanging, or just taking forever). If this version of Mandrake doesn't work, then your information will give lots of explanations as to why.

Based on all that you've said, I may have no choice but to ultimately speak to the Mathworks again on Monday, should nothing work before then.

st2000 suggested that I get a newer version of MATLAB from the Mathworks. Ironically, the representative offered this right away, but I turned it down. I've grown so familiar with my current version, and all of my programs are written for it, so I didn't want to take a chance with a newer version. That choice may have been a mistake with such a large gap between the age of the software, and the newer hardware that I'm trying to run it on.

I'll post again, should I get this Mandrake ISO to burn. Hopefully it'll work, but at least I now won't be surprised if it doesn't.

As stated before, I have a 32-bit installation CD that worked with Wine on Lubuntu. However, I'm really curious to see how a 64-bit installation would perform.

Thanks again for the valuable information. It's very helpful to know that the Mathworks is strict with their specifications. At least I know what I'm up against.
evansste
 
Posts: 85
Joined: October 8th, 2014, 8:19 am

Re: Kernel and glibc Compatibility

Postby evansste » November 28th, 2015, 7:16 pm

Well, asheets, you were right about the problems with installing an old, 64-bit operating system on a modern motherboard. Installation didn't get very far. My new motherboard only has SATA sockets, and the operating system is expecting IDE. The funny thing is that, even though it couldn't see my hard drive, it gives me the option to choose a disk/ide driver. That list contains a lot of "sata" options, although I don't think it's necessarily referring to the modern SATA protocol that is in use today. Among the list of options is the following:

sata_nv
sata_promise
sata_qstor
sata_sil
sata_sis
sata_svw
sata_sx4
sata_uli
sata_via
sata_vsc

Do any of these terms seem familiar to you as disk/ide drivers?

It seems as if I'll be calling the Mathworks on Monday for that newer version of MATLAB. They've given me a 64-bit version of my old version of MATLAB (which is version 7.0.1), but as you've indicated, finding a Linux operating system that is compatible with that version, and also compatible with my new motherboard, is a real challenge. So trying out the newer version of MATLAB may be my best option.

Thanks to both you, and st2000, for your valuable input. The information has been very educational, and I appreciate the time, and advice, that both of you have given.

Also, thanks, st2000, for telling me about Octave. I've fallen in love with MATLAB, but it's good to know of this other option, since it seems very similar.
evansste
 
Posts: 85
Joined: October 8th, 2014, 8:19 am

Re: Kernel and glibc Compatibility

Postby asheets » November 29th, 2015, 5:13 pm

evansste wrote:Well, asheets, you were right about the problems with installing an old, 64-bit operating system on a modern motherboard. Installation didn't get very far. My new motherboard only has SATA sockets, and the operating system is expecting IDE. The funny thing is that, even though it couldn't see my hard drive, it gives me the option to choose a disk/ide driver. That list contains a lot of "sata" options, although I don't think it's necessarily referring to the modern SATA protocol that is in use today. Among the list of options is the following:

<snip>


A quick check of Mandriva 2005 reviews indicates that SATA either was a bit buggy, or didn't cover all the (at the time) modern hardware. That ISO may simply not have the drivers you need for a late-model motherboard.
asheets
 
Posts: 298
Joined: February 17th, 2011, 4:30 pm


Return to Help Me! Software

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron