Using Windows XP for an Unsupported Motherboard

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Using Windows XP for an Unsupported Motherboard

Postby evansste » November 24th, 2015, 7:54 pm

I have an expensive piece of software that I bought years ago (MATLAB). I want to perform complex calculations, which have required that I buy a new motherboard. My version of MATLAB only works on Windows XP, but the new motherboard doesn't support Windows XP. The oldest operating system it supports is Windows 7.

Even though the motherboard doesn't support Windows XP, is it still possible to somehow get Windows XP installed on it? Here's the new motherboard:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00HEU ... ge_o00_s00

Is this motherboard too advanced to possibly run Windows XP, or do I still have a chance at getting this to work?

I greatly appreciate any suggestions, or opinions.

One more thing. For all of you who love Linux, let me say that I agree with you. When buying MATLAB, they offered me the option of getting a Linux version. I'm kicking myself, to this day, that I didn't get it. If I had, then I wouldn't have this problem. Thanks again for your insight.
evansste
 
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Re: Using Windows XP for an Unsupported Motherboard

Postby bandersnatch » November 25th, 2015, 4:17 am

Hi,

IMHO you have 2 possible options:

1/ HARDWARE-BASED
Native installation of XP on a system using your mainboard
- Fast
- Probably possible but likely to cause problems (especially with the graphics card)
- Limited expandability (e.g. may of 3.5Gb RAM, 1TB hard drive etc..)

2/ SOFTWARE BASED
Emulation of XP under Linux/Win7/..whatever using VMWARE/VurtualPC/WINE etc...
- Easy to get running
- You can create an XP vm DIRECTLY from a disk image of your currently running MATLAB/XP machine
- Only a bit slower
- Native OS can make full use of the modern hardware
- You can run MULTIPLE copies of MATLAB simultaneously in multiple VMs
(Great if you have a main MATLAB project but want to quickly experiment with
an idea in a second instance of MATLAB without closing your main project)

- Future-proof: You can continue using MATLAB in an XP VM for the rest of your days, rgeardless of new HW & OS versions...

If you have already paid somuch money for MATLAB then buying a copy of VMWARE WOrkstation is notz gonna hurt too much
& you can then move to your beloved Linux if you really want...


G$$gle for "VMWARE Workstation XP client"..

The process is actually VERY easy, but I am sure we can help you if you get stuck...

STFB
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Re: Using Windows XP for an Unsupported Motherboard

Postby asheets » November 25th, 2015, 12:25 pm

Load up a reasonably current version of Linux on the new hardware, and install Oracle VirtualBox as a type II/personal hypervisor. Install XP as a client OS on OVB.

https://www.virtualbox.org/

Ping me if you need help on the specifics, but I think that you'll find the process reasonably simple.
asheets
 
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Re: Using Windows XP for an Unsupported Motherboard

Postby evansste » November 25th, 2015, 5:01 pm

Thanks so much, to both of you. Your suggestions are top-notch. Fortunately, it seems as if I may be able to get MATLAB installed on Linux, directly, after all.

After my post, the idea, which bandersnatch has also proposed, immediately came to mind. I would try WINE in hopes of getting MATLAB to install. I was skeptical that it would work, but I was wrong. It also wasn't that difficult. I installed WINE from the Lubuntu software center, and then installed MATLAB with my CD. All I had to do was click on the setup.exe file, and it was just as if I was installing on Windows XP. The only difference is that any files, which would normally have been saved on the C:\ drive, were saved in a "C" directory within the hidden WINE directory.

Not being completely sure that this installation was as stable as the native Windows XP installation, I contacted the Mathworks. It then got even better. The representative informed me that they offer a Linux installer, but that the actual software package will run on any operating system. He then gave me the necessary files needed in order to use their Linux installer. Not only that, I recognize that my new motherboard, and processor are 64-bit. This is an unexpected enhancement that I didn't foresee.

I'm downloading the 64-bit version of Lubuntu as I type this post. All of this is a lot better news than what I possibly could have hoped for.

When I told the Mathworks representative that I used WINE in order to install MATLAB with my Windows XP CD, he too was impressed. He gave me a few commands to try at the MATLAB prompt. One, of the two that he gave, didn't work. However, it didn't completely fail either since it gave him an error message output, which he wasn't expecting.

So thanks again for the many great suggestions. WINE now gets more of my respect after all of this. I really wasn't expecting it to work so well, or be so easy. There are a few more windows-based applications that I may have to try with WINE.

Thanks again.
evansste
 
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Re: Using Windows XP for an Unsupported Motherboard

Postby asheets » November 25th, 2015, 5:13 pm

OK, you've got me curious. Which versions of MATLAB, Java and Wine did you use? WineHQ doesn't exactly report glowing success stories for MATLAB; I would have guessed that the java interpreter might have issues jumping between Ubuntu and Wine environments.
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Re: Using Windows XP for an Unsupported Motherboard

Postby evansste » November 25th, 2015, 5:37 pm

Hello asheets.

I don't know anything about Java, but I'm using MATLAB 7.0.1 with service pack 1. Wine is version 1:1.6.2-Oubuntu (wine 1.6). This version number for Wine was copied directly from the software center in Lubuntu 14.04.3 LTS.

There were four different Wine programs in the software center. I chose the one that was labeled "Wine windows program loader".

Believe me, I was surprised that it was that simple to use Wine too. Normally, when I'm trying something new with Linux, I run into trouble and end up having to search the web for different options to perform the same task. But this was just as simple as I've described. Maybe it's because my version of MATLAB is pretty old. I don't know. But it was a breeze.
evansste
 
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Re: Using Windows XP for an Unsupported Motherboard

Postby Jarrod C. » December 4th, 2015, 12:42 pm

If you have to run Windows (or the Linux does not work) then look into the compatibility mode in Windows7. There are two options, once where the OS simply tells the software that it is Windows XP and the other is where you actually install a full blown copy of Windows XP into your 7 install and it uses that as a VM to run the software natively.
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Re: Using Windows XP for an Unsupported Motherboard

Postby asheets » December 4th, 2015, 3:41 pm

evansste wrote:Hello asheets.

I don't know anything about Java, but I'm using MATLAB 7.0.1 with service pack 1. Wine is version 1:1.6.2-Oubuntu (wine 1.6). This version number for Wine was copied directly from the software center in Lubuntu 14.04.3 LTS.



I'm still curious... can you run the following commands?

java --version
uname -a

Thanks...
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Re: Using Windows XP for an Unsupported Motherboard

Postby evansste » December 5th, 2015, 4:09 pm

Hello asheets and Jarrod C. Thanks, to both of you, for your responses.

asheets, after typing in the commands you showed, I get the following outputs:

~$ java --version
The program 'java' can be found in the following packages:
* default-jre
* gcj-4.8-jre-headless
* openjdk-7-jre-headless
* gcj-4.6-jre-headless
* openjdk-6-jre-headless
Try: sudo apt-get install <selected package>

~$ uname -a
Linux evansste-KM400-8235 3.19.0-25-generic #26~14.04.1-Ubuntu SMP Fri Jul 24 21:18:00 UTC 2015 i686 i686 i686 GNU/Linux

Hopefully that helps to satisfy your curiosity. Let me know if you have any more questions.

Thanks for your suggestion, Jarrod C. I didn't know that Windows 7 offered either of those functions. That's a bit impressive. However, I've already made up my mind to never buy another version of Windows. I stop at Windows XP.

Ironically, I recently made a post, in an Adobe forum, on this very issue.

https://forums.adobe.com/thread/547150

It's an old thread, and my post is the very last one. But if you don't want to read it there, I'll say some of it again here.

I won't go back to Windows because I agree too much with the Linux philosophy. It's the philosophy that says that people ought to be able to make their computers do what they want them to do. We own our machines, right? We paid for them. So why should we have to keep paying for operating systems that force us to change setups that we already like?

This last situation has made me a true Linux believer. If it weren't for Linux, I'd have to re-buy an operating system, that I already own (just a different version), in order to make it work with my new hardware. Your solution is a perfect example of this. I'd have to buy Windows 7 in order to get Windows XP to work. It's great to know that Windows 7, at least offers this feature. Otherwise, I'd be stuck with the Windows 7 interface, whether I liked it or not. I went through the same issue with all of my previous Windows upgrades, starting with Windows 95.

I could go on an on on this subject, but the short story is that Linux saved my bacon. I can use my new hardware without having to spend more money on an operating system that behaves differently than what I'm used to using. Lubuntu looks, and works, exactly the same on all of my systems; both new and old. I don't have to re-learn anything, or accept changes that I don't like. I can take advantage of the new hardware advances without changing the way that I operate my computer. I'm grateful to the Linux developers, and general Linux community, for that.

In any case, I do appreciate your input. A while back, I briefly owned a laptop that came with Windows 7 installed on it. I was bummed that I couldn't install MATLAB on it. Had I known, what you just taught me, I could have solved that problem back then. So it's good to know. I also appreciate anyone who takes the time to help answer my questions. All of this knowledge is good knowledge, and I know that your time is valuable. So, once again, thank you.
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